Dealing with Anxiety / How to not enact hypothetical/imaginary situations/scenarios/conversations in your head.

TL’DR;: INSTEAD OF GETTING ANXIOUS ABOUT THINGS, GET OFF YOUR FAT ASS, AND EITHER DEAL WITH THE SITUATION THAT’S MAKING YOU ANXIOUS OR IF IT’S NOT IN YOUR HANDS, GET OUT OF THE FREKING SITUATION…Being in a situation that you can’t control is YOUR FAULT, and so it’s only YOU who has to take the action of getting out of it…

I can’t help but enact hypothetical/imaginary situations/scenarios/conversations in your head. This is the root cause of all anxiety, worry and stress…

If there’s one thing that i want in life, it’s to not do this…

And i know i’m not alone in this: http://www.socialanxietysupport.com/forum/f26/constructing-imaginary-conversations-and-scenarios-in-your-head-374569/

LET”S GET RID OF THIS. TIME FOR PSYCHOLOGY TO STEP IN:

What you may not know is that much of your anxiety is actually self-produced — yes, you read that correctly.

You may blame your job, your family or your circumstances for your distress, but the reality is how you perceive anything in your life is entirely up to you.

Anxiety is a feeling of uneasiness, apprehension, and/or dread about a real or imagined future event. It is tied to a sense that these unpleasant events are at least partially unpredictable and uncontrollable, and therefore accompanied by an uncomfortable level of uncertainty.

Anxiety and worry are knots of both emotions and physiology feelings. Most psychologists look at anxiety as purely emotional: the outward sign of repressed negative feelings and inner conflict. But over 30 years of scientific research into severe anxiety disorders and panic attacks has established that all anxiety has a real, physiological cause that is just as important to treat — especially for relief of anxiety related to hormonal imbalance.

This is good news. It means that anxiety symptoms that were once dismissed as character flaws (think of the terms “worry wart”, “head case” and “control freak”) are not feelings you just have to live with or medicate when they get too severe for you to function. There’s a lot more to the story — and a lot that you can do to get that monkey of anxiety off your back.

What’s not natural is to feel afraid and upset most of the time without any tangible cause. Like our immune response, our fight or flight response is meant to click into action in the face of danger and then rest. But in our day and age, too many of us never get to relax: our minds are perpetually on high alert with the accompanying physical response.

It’s no exaggeration to say there is an epidemic of anxiety.

Our culture tells us that feelings of fear, vulnerability, and even shyness are signs of weakness — which makes anxiety the fault of the victim.

anxiety is a knot of emotions and physiology. The root cause of the anxiety could arise on the emotional side or the physical side — or both.

The feeling of anxiety always begins with a trigger that initiates a survival response from the limbic system. At the first whiff of apparent danger, your brain chemistry, blood hormones and cellular metabolism all whirl into action.

When you have chronic anxiety, this response may lessen but it never gets turned off, even when there’s no palpable threat. Over time your anxiety symptoms may be triggered by less and less serious events because your limbic system has been sensitized to react in a highly anxious way.

Here are four types of faulty-thinking that might be the root cause of your anxiety and dragging you down:

1. Negative self-talk.

Want to break this habit? Start by becoming aware of your self-talk. Spend a day noting any negative, self-defeating thoughts you have in a journal. Next, spend some time transforming each negative message into a compassionate, loving one.

For example: “I’m not good at my job” becomes “I am good at my job. I am still learning and each day I get better and better.”

This may feel awkward at first, but once you get the hang of this exercise you will be able to catch negative self-talk on the spot and mentally rephrase the message into one that is more productive. Your self-talk, whether negative or positive, is a habit like any other.

2. Unrealistic expectations.

Examine your expectations of yourself, of others and the world around you. Are they realistic? If not, how can you make them more reasonable? And if you expect nothing at all, anything awesome that happens is just icing on the cake!

3. Thinking you “should.”

Make a list of all the things you think you should do or be. Who’s shoulds are they? If they aren’t your own, cross them off the list and forget about them. If they are your own, ask yourself if they are realistic. Maybe you actually should lose weight if your health is at risk, but if you think you should lose weight so that others will accept you, it is time to reevaluate.

4. Taking things too personally.

Don’t take anything too personally. You never know what is going on with the other person and let’s face it, taking things personally just makes you feel bad about yourself. If you truly suspect someone is acting out because of something you did, ask them about it instead of letting neurotic assumptions feed your anxiety.

Your mind is programmed to believe whatever it is told the most. So if you constantly engage in negative self-talk, expect too much of yourself and others, believe that you “should” do something in order to feel good about yourself or worry that everyone has it out for you — well, my friend, your brain will simply act out accordingly.

HOW TO DEAL WITH ANXIETY

  1. Stand Up to Anxious Thinking by Taking Action 
  2. Evaluate Your Thoughts and Beliefs
  3. Stay and Calm Your Body or Exit the Situation

ref:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-15096/how-to-get-to-the-root-cause-of-your-anxiety.html

http://www.glynissherwood.com/blog/5-steps-to-overcoming-chronic-anxiety

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how to deal with anxiety/worry

Well, for one, as soon as I googled “how to deal with anxiety”, I didn’t feel anxious anymore….so i guess one way is to not give the power to your head to bubble up thoughts that make me anxious…

Continuing with my own advice, here are some things that help me:

  • write down the worst that could happen and just accept it…
  • Your anxious thoughts are much worse than any outcome that’s logically possible, and you need to realize that in you consciousness….you need to accept that consciously and just move on…
  • Don’t try to suppress the feeling of anxiety, or try to divert your attention…that might work for the short term, but eventually the anxious thoughts surface in much worst form…
  • Smile…when you have already accepted the worst, any other thought has to make you smile at the stupidity of your mind in proposing more thoughts on the subject when you’ve clearly moved on…
  • Count your blessings and appreciate the fact that you’re healthy and alive….
  • Know that this too shall pass
  • Talk about it.( Though i’m not good at sharing my stress with others, i’ve found it immensely helpful when i did actually reach out to those closest to me)
  • Ask for help. This will dissipate your stress and get you out of your head. ( Again, i’m not good at this, but this can do wonders, as those closest to you lighten your load, provide you emotional and physical support and just make dealing with stuff much easier)
  • Throw money at the problem. I hate to say this, but it’s true that money does make most problems go away, and so a stressful period is not the best time to be a miser….For things that money can handle, let money handle those.

At this point i went through some top google links, but didn’t find anything more helpful that what i’ve described above…

BBC.Horizon.2015.Whats.The.Right.Diet.For.You.

Part 1

NOTES:

  1. There are 3 kinds of eaters:
    1. FEASTERS: have low levels of the gut hormone that tells them they’re full
    2. CONSTANT CRAVERS: genes cause their cells to feel need of constant replenishing
    3. EMOTIONAL EATERS: eat when stressful
  2. Each kind above have different dietary needs
  3. Right target when dieting should be to loose 5% of the body weight
  4. diets are about habits, not will power
  5. RIght diets
    1. FEASTERS:
      1. High protein eg. meat bean grains and cereals fish
      2. Low GI (Glysemic Index) ie foods that release cards over long time eg. pasta rice
    2. CONSTANT CRAVERS:
      1. They feel hungry constantly,so deiting is suffering, so they should fast intermittently eg. 2 days a week (ie 800 cal). this shocks their bodies into burning fat. But eat healthy on rest 5 days
      2. avoid high carbs like bread and pasta
      3. High protein eg. meat bean grains and cereals fish
      4. carbs burn to give sugar (glucose) for functioning for 5 days. But on fasting days, there is only 800cal intake (with no carbs), so the body burns stored fat to make up
    3. EMOTIONAL EATERS:
      1. low cal diet
      2. group support